Trump, Obama Talk About Migrant Caravans at Campaign Stops

Trump, Obama Talk About Migrant Caravans at Campaign Stops

America's Voice Admin
November 4, 2018

Trump, Obama Talk About Migrant Caravans at Campaign Stops

Central American migrants pack into the back of a trailer truck as they begin their morning trek as part of a thousands-strong caravan hoping to reach the U.S. border, in Isla, Veracruz state, Mexico, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2018.
Central American migrants pack into the back of a trailer truck as they begin their morning trek as part of a thousands-strong caravan hoping to reach the U.S. border, in Isla, Veracruz state, Mexico, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2018.

The Central American migrant caravans were on the minds of President Donald Trump and former President Barack Obama on the last Sunday of campaigning before Tuesday's mid-term election.
Trump came out for a rally in Macon, Georgia for Brian Kemp, the Republican candidate for governor.
He gave what he called message to the migrants hoping to cross the border from Mexico.
"Turn back now because you're not coming into the United States unless you go through the process."
Trump again said the caravans are full of criminals and "rough people," although reporters who have traveled with the migrants say they have primarily seen women and children.

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The president said deploying U.S. soldiers to the border shows the United States is "not playing games."
Just before Trump spoke, his predecessor, President Barack Obama, campaigned in Gary, Indiana for Democratic Senator Joe Donnelly.
In a voice hoarse from several days of campaign speeches, Obama criticized Trump's belief that the migrants are an invasion and a threat. He said the men and women in the military deserve better than to be used for what he called a "political stunt."
Earlier Sunday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the deployment of thousands U.S. troops to the Mexican border has nothing to do with boosting Republicans days before the election.
"I've been involved in scores of conversations about stopping illegal immigration from Mexico and never once has there been a discussion of the political impact in U.S. domestic politics," he told CBS's Face the Nation.
The main migrant caravan that left San Pedro Sula, Honduras about three weeks ago is still about 1,600 kilometers from the U.S.-Mexican border. The majority say they still hope to be able to get into the U.S. and work, while others have accepted Mexico's offer of asylum and jobs.
Two other smaller caravans are also slowly making their way north.

Original Article